Reaction Wheels
 

Sinclair Interplanetary pioneered high-reliability vacuum-lubricated reaction wheels for picosatellites, nanosatellites and microsats.  There are currently 76 wheels on-orbit, all working well.

All of these reaction wheels incorporate a built-in digital processor.  They can be commanded over a serial bus to produce a desired speed, momentum or torque.  They report digital telemetry concerning speed, temperature, voltage, current, and other health parameters.


 1 Nms Microsatellite Wheel
This is our largest wheel, suitable for 100 kg Earth-observation missions.  There are currently 20 units on-orbit on 5 spacecraft, with the first launch in June 2016.



 60 mNms Microsatellite Wheel
This is our most technically advanced wheel, packing high-torque motor phase current control electronics into a small package.  There are 16 units on-orbit on 4 spacecraft, with the first launch in June 2014.

Datasheet and Pricing

Interface Control Document

Network Addressing Document
30 mNms Nanosatellite Wheel


This was our first wheel design, and still the most popular.   First launched in April 2008, there are now 30 units on-orbit.  Most of these are onboard the University of Toronto SpaceFlight Lab's GNB series of spacecraft.  They fit comfortably into a 6U to 12U cubesat.

Datasheet and Pricing

Mechanical Interface Control Document (Rev 1.1)

Electrical Interface Control Document (Rev 1.2)

Reaction Wheel NSP Application (Rev 1.0)

NSP Packet Protocol (Rev 1.0) 

NSP Bootloader (Rev 1.2)
10 mNms Picosatellite Wheel
This wheel is ideally suited for smaller cubesats.  There are 10 units on-orbit on 4 spacecraft, with the first launch in June 2014.

Datasheet and Pricing

Mechanical Interface Control Document (Rev 1.2)

Electrical Interface Control Document (Rev 1.2)

Reaction Wheel NSP Application (Rev 1.0)

NSP Packet Protocol (Rev 1.0) 

NSP Bootloader (Rev 1.2)
 7 mNms Picosatellite Wheel
Designed for a specific mission that was subsequently canceled, this wheel never really got off the ground.  Wheels of this size, or even smaller, can be built if somebody really wants them.

 Datasheet